EN 614-1:2006+A1:2009

Safety of machinery – Ergonomic design principles – Part 1: Terminology and general principles

This European Standard establishes the ergonomic principles to be followed during the process of design of machinery. This European Standard applies to the interactions between operators and machinery when installing, operating, adjusting, maintaining, cleaning, dismantling, repairing or transporting equipment, and outlines the principles to be followed in taking the health, safety and well-being of the operator into account. This European Standard provides a framework within which the range of more specific ergonomics standards and other related standards relevant to machinery design should be applied. The ergonomic principles given in this European Standard apply to all ranges of human abilities and characteristics to ensure safety, health and well-being and overall system performance. Information will need to be interpreted to suit the intended use.

Pages: 25

EN 574:1996+A1:2008

Safety of machinery – Two hand control devices – Functional aspects – Principlies for design

This standard Specifies the safety requirements of a two-hand control device and its logic unit as defined in 3.1. Describes the main characteristics of two-hand control devices for the achievement of safety and sets out combinations of functional characteristics for three types. Does not apply to devices intended to be used as enabling devices, hold to run devices and as special control devices. This standard does not specify with which machines two-hand control devices shall be used. It also does not specify which types of two-hand-control device shall be used. Moreover it does not specify the distance between the two-hand control device and the danger zone (see 9.8). The standard provides requirements and guidance on the design and selection (based on a risk assessment) of two-hand control devices including their assessment, the prevention of defeat and the avoidance of faults. The standard also provides requirements and guidance for two-hand control devices containing a programmable electronic system (see 7). This standard applies to all two-hand control devices, independent of the energy used, including: – Two-hand control devices which are or are not integral parts of a machine; – Two-hand control devices which consist of one or more than one separate elements.

Pages: 31

EN 547-3:1996+A1:2008

Safety of machinery – Human body measurements – Part 3: Anthropometric data

This European Standard specifies current requirements for human body measurements (anthropometric data) that are required by EN 547-1 and EN 547-2 for the calculation of access opening dimensions as applied to machinery. The anthropometric data originate from static measurements of nude persons and do not take into account body movements, clothing, equipment, machinery operating conditions or environmental conditions. The data are based on information from anthropometric surveys representative of population groups within Europe comprising at least three million people. Both men and women are taken into account. Measurements are given, as required by EN 547-1 and EN 547-2, for the 5th, 95th and 99th percentiles of the relevant population group within Europe.

Pages: 27

EN 547-2:1996+A1:2008

Safety of machinery – Human body measurements – Part 2: Pinciples for determining the dimensions required for access openings

This European Standard specifies the dimensions of openings for access as applied to machinery as defined in EN 292-1. It provides the dimensions to which the values given in EN 547-3 are applicable. Values for additional space requirements are given in annex A. This European Standard has been prepared primarily for non-mobile machinery, there may be additional specific requirements for mobile machinery. Dimensions for access openings are based on the values for the 95th percentile, whereas reach distances are based on the values for the 5th percentile, in each case the least favourable body dimension of the expected user population being used as a basis. The same considerations apply to the location of access openings. The anthropometric data given in EN 547-3 originate from static measurements of nude persons and do not take into account body movements, clothing, equipment, machinery operating conditions or environmental conditions. This European Standard shows how to combine the anthropometric data with suitable allowances to take these factors into account. Situations where people are to be prevented from reaching a hazard are dealt with in EN 294.

Pages: 27

EN 547-1:1996+A1:2008

Safety of machinery – Human body measurements – Part 1: Principles for determining the dimensions required for openings for whole body access into machinery

This European Standard specifies the dimensions of openings for whole body access as applied to machinery as defined in EN 292-1. It provides the dimensions to which the values given in EN 547-3 are applicable. Values for additional space requirements are given in annex A. This European Standard has been prepared primarily for non-mobile machinery, there may be additional specific requirements for mobile machinery. Dimensions for passages are based on the values for either the 95th or the 99th percentile of the expected user population. Values for the 99th percentile apply to emergency egress routes. The anthropometric data given in EN 547-3 originate from static measurements of nude persons and do not take into account body movements, clothing, equipment, machinery operating conditions or environmental conditions. This European Standard shows how to combine the anthropometric data with suitable allowances to take these factors into account. Situations where people are to be prevented from reaching a hazard are dealt with in EN 294.

Pages: 17

EN ISO 14121-1:2007

Safety of machinery – Risk assessment – Part 1: Principles

This part of ISO 14121 establishes general principles intended to be used to meet the risk reduction objectives established in ISO 12100-1:2003, Clause 5. These principles of risk assessment bring together knowledge and experience of the design, use, incidents, accidents and harm related to machinery in order to assess the risks posed during the relevant phases of the life cycle of a machine. This part of ISO 14121 provides guidance on the information that will be required to enable risk assessment to be carried out. Procedures are described for identifying hazards and estimating and evaluating risk. It also gives guidance on the making of decisions relating to the safety of machinery and on the type of documentation required to verify the risk assessment carried out. It is not applicable to risks posed to domestic animals, property or the environment.

Pages: 28.



EN 1037:1995+A1:2008

Safety of machinery – Prevention of unexpected start-up

This standard specifies built-in safety measures aimed at preventing unexpected machine start-up (see 3.2) to allow safe human interventions in danger zones (see Annex A).
This standard applies to unexpected start-up from all types of energy source, i.e.:
– Power supply, e.g. electrical, hydraulic, pneumatic;
– Stored energy due to, e.g., gravity, compressed springs;
– External influences, e.g. from wind.

Pages: 18.



EN ISO 13850:2008

Safety of machinery – Emergency stop – Principles for design

This International Standard specifies functional requirements and design principles for the emergency stop function on machinery, independent of the type of energy used to control the function.
It is applicable to all machinery except for:
– machines in which the provision of emergency stop would not lessen the risk;
– hand-held portable machines and hand-guided machines.

Pages: 6.