Interpretation Machinery Directive 2006/42/EC: Interview with Ian Fraser

Interview with Ian Fraser, former Policy Officer at the European Commission responsible for the Machinery Directive (2006/42/EC), and Team Leader about questions related to the Machinery Directive (2006/42/EC).

Doug Nix and Han Zuyderwijk discuss with Ian about:
– the regulatory developments in the directive in the last ten years;
– the concept of the ‘person authorised to compile the technical documentation’ and how it differs from the authorised representative;
– the integration of risk assessment into the EMC Directive and Low Voltage Directive;
– responsibilities for products placed in the market when a) the relevant directives are amended, and b) relevant standards are amended. What does that mean for the conformity assessment and the Declaration of Conformity;
– how the future amendments to the Medical Devices Regulation/Directive relates to the Machinery Directive;
– are electromagnetic compatibility aspects of machinery going to be reinforced in the Machinery Directive;
whether there should be more regulations or certification of CE/Machine Safety consultants.

We briefly lost connection and therefore the recording was interrupted for a short while. Obviously, it pays off to join the live session ;)

Please leave your comments or questions below.

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Report shows fewer dangerous products reaching EU market

Brussels, 08 May 2012 – EU consumers want to be sure that the products – whether produced in the EU or imported from third-countries – are safe. The good news is that thanks to the increasing effectiveness of the EU’s rapid alert system for non-food dangerous products (“RAPEX”) dangerous products are detected earlier and more effectively and are more promptly removed from the EU market. This process involves a chain of actions including upstream efforts to design out risks at source, better risk assessment and close co-operation between EU authorities, notably customs, to identify risks at the points of entry.

Risk Assessment Guide

At the very core of the CE marking for machinery is the risk assessment. Manufacturers are allowed to do the risk assessment themselves. It is even highly recommendable to do it, because it provides for a excellent insight in the safety level of the machinery. But how to conduct the risk assessment?
The Risk Assessment Guide explains a standardized methodology for hazard identification and risk analysis and risk evaluation. This methodology is very practical: it is used by our own experts. The Guide also includes the checklist for the hazard identification, and a template to record the risk analysis and evaluation. As a bonus, you’ll receive a copy of the standard for risk assessment for machinery, the EN 14121-1.

COMING SOON

EN ISO 14121-1:2007

Safety of machinery – Risk assessment – Part 1: Principles

This part of ISO 14121 establishes general principles intended to be used to meet the risk reduction objectives established in ISO 12100-1:2003, Clause 5. These principles of risk assessment bring together knowledge and experience of the design, use, incidents, accidents and harm related to machinery in order to assess the risks posed during the relevant phases of the life cycle of a machine. This part of ISO 14121 provides guidance on the information that will be required to enable risk assessment to be carried out. Procedures are described for identifying hazards and estimating and evaluating risk. It also gives guidance on the making of decisions relating to the safety of machinery and on the type of documentation required to verify the risk assessment carried out. It is not applicable to risks posed to domestic animals, property or the environment.

Pages: 28.