London food company fined after worker’s fingers cut

Donut Maker
Donut Maker by Steve Snodgrass, on Flickr
Two London-based food companies have been fined a total of £15,000 ($22,600) after a worker had his fingers severed while using a food mixing blender at a factory in Ealing.

The cleaning hatch of the blender was open, exposing the rotating blade and as the worker started using the machine, three fingers and a thumb on his right hand were amputated.

Worker crushed in rotating machine

A factory in Ashton-under-Lyne in the UK has been fined £26,000 (approx. $39,500 or €32,000) after one of its workers suffered major injuries when he became trapped in rotating machinery.

The employee was pulled into a 14-foot-high metal-shaping machine when his overalls became entangled. He was working at ADA Machining Services Ltd on Kayley Industrial Estate, Richmond Street, on 2 January 2008.

European Commission Sues Estonia Over Medical Device Directive

Brussels, 24 June 2010. The European Commission has decided to refer Estonia to the EU’s Court of Justice for not implementing the revised Medical Devices Directive (2007/47/EC) within the deadline (December 21, 2008). A referral of the case has been decided today as Estonia failed to notify transposition measures as required by this Directive.

Directive 2007/47/EC enhances the criteria for the conformity assessment of medical devices and strengthens the procedures for such assessment. The Directive aims on the one hand to ensure a high level of protection of human health and safety and on the other hand to ensure that medical devices can circulate freely throughout the Single Market (thereby offering manufacturers economies of scale and users greater choice). Member States were obliged to notify the Commission of measures taken to implement Directive 2007/47/EC by December 21, 2008, but Estonia has so far failed to do so.

Source: European Commission

EN ISO 12100-1:2003 +A1:2009

Safety of machinery – Basic concepts, general principles for design – Part 1: Basic terminology, methodology

This European Standard defines basic terminology and methodology used in achieving safety of machinery. The provisions stated in this standard are intended for the designer.

Pages: 33



EN ISO 12100-2:2003 +A1:2009

Safety of machinery – Basic concepts, general principles for design – Part 2: Technical principles

This European Standard defines technical principles to help designers in achieving safety in the design of machinery. This European Standard is intended to be used together with EN ISO 12100-1 when considering the solution to a specific problem. The two parts of EN ISO 12100 can be used independently of other documents or as a basis for the preparation of other type-A standards or type-B or -C standards. The provisions stated in this standard are intended for the designer.

Pages: 32



EN 12198-2:2003+A1:2008

Safety of Machinery – Assessment and reduction of risks arising from radiation emitted by machinery – Part 2: Radiation emission measurement procedure

This European Standard defines basic technology and specifies general procedures for making and reporting measurements of quantities related to radiation emitted by machinery. It covers the different radiation emissions as defined in EN 12198-1. This standard applies to machinery as defined in 3.1 of EN 292-1:1991.

Pages: 15

EN 12198-1:2000+A1:2008

Safety of Machinery – Assessment and reduction of risks arising from radiation emitted by machinery – Part 1: General principles

This standard deals with the emission of radiation from machinery. This European Standard gives advice to manufacturers for the construction of safe machinery, if no relevant C-type standard exists. This radiation emission may be functional for processing or may be undesirable. The issues of electromagnetic compatibility are not addressed in the standard. This European Standard is intended to give advice to C-type standardization groups, on how to identify radiation emissions or fields, how to determine their significance and intensity, how to assess the possible risks and what means may be used to avoid or reduce radiation emissions. This advice should be elaborated in C-type standards for specific classes of machines as assessable requirements. This standard deals with the emission of all types of electromagnetic non-ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation may be dealt with in other documents or in the future revisions. This standard does not deal with the emission of laser radiation. Radiation sources fixed to a machine which are used only for lighting are excluded from the scope of this standard. This standard applies to machinery as defined in clause 3.1 of EN 292-1:1991.

Pages: 28

EN ISO 13732-1:2008

Ergonomics of the thermal environment – Methods for the assessment of human responses to contact with surfaces – Part 1: Hot surfaces

This part of ISO 13732 provides temperature threshold values for burns that occur when human skin is in contact with a hot solid surface. It also describes methods for the assessment of the risks of burning, when humans could or might touch hot surfaces with their unprotected skin. This part of ISO 13732 also gives guidance for cases where it is necessary to specify temperature limit values for hot surfaces; it does not set surface temperature limit values. This part of ISO 13732 deals with contact periods of 0,5 s and longer. It is applicable to contact when the surface temperature is essentially maintained during the contact (see 4.1). This part of ISO 13732 is applicable to the hot surfaces of all kind of objects: equipment, products, buildings, natural objects, etc. For the purposes of simplification, it mentions only products; nevertheless, it applies to all other objects as well. It is applicable to products used in any environment, e.g. in the workplace, in the home. It is applicable to hot surfaces of products that may be touched by healthy adults, children, elderly people and also by people with physical disabilities.

Pages: 37